Find me online

Facebook LinkedIn YouTube IMDB ProjectorFilms   




Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Nelson Nutmeg DVD in ASDA - physically exciting - but what's the future for film?



So as you can, my debut feature film is now on the shelves of Asda. Exciting times. In the cheeky video I popped in with co-director and co-writer Danny Stack to bag us a copy.

This clip was filmed on the day of the DVD release. But by this point in time the movie had already been out on iTunes, Google Play, Amazon and Sky Store for a couple of weeks. Here's some thoughts and conclusions from this experience.

One: People are excited about a DVD
People prefer a DVD probably because they can touch it and hold it. Certainly, as far as our experience is concerned, our fans (and cast and crew) were more thrilled about this release than the digital release. Perhaps because it also felt more 'real' and 'day to day'. The DVD is exclusive to Asda. Asda is somewhere they may go on a regular basis. So the film isn't something that is separate to their normal world, happening only in oddball film land. It's at their local store, next to 'proper' DVDs from Disney.

Two: As a film maker, you can build more marketing interest around a DVD.
The funky little video above gained a lot of views on Facebook. I was going to say more views than we got for the equivalent clips we did for the digital release. But actually - we didn't really have any of those. Why? Because there isn't something you can really film for a digital release. A DVD, by being tangible, can be used as a prop for all kinds of marketing effort.

Three: It can sell out
One of the downsides, compared to digital releases, is that a physical item needs shelf space and stock. So it can therefore, also sell out and be unavailable. As our movie has a lot of local support it sold out very quickly in our area and so there were empty shelves with some people not being able to buy it.

Four: The future
Any kind of physical release will become more and more uncommon in the future if trends continue as they are - and I see no reason why trends would change. For most people a DVD is a burden, not a treat. They need a DVD player for starters and to sit at home. With a digital release they can watch on their phone on the beach, at the park, in the car, on the train, in bed etc etc. And on many different devices. A challenge for film makers is therefore what physical items they can create to both sell and build content around. Special editions etc.

Business links
Distribution via Evolutionary Films
DVD via Gilt Edge Media

Monday, May 15, 2017

Podcast Episode 61: TV writer, Martin Day




Is there a career ladder that writers can move up on anymore? It used to be that you would start on regular 'soaps' and then move into ongoing drama and then onto your own shows. Is that even possible anymore? Experienced TV writer and WGGB rep for the South West, Martin Day, talks about his own career. It's had ups and downs of course, but most interestingly, what has changed most has been the actual business of TV writing.

In my classic way, I was a bit controversial and confrontational in my thoughts, in order that we properly explore the issue. My concern is that the BBC, through various schemes, still tries to offer a way in for new writers. But does the BBC actually directly hire enough writers to be able to offer any kind of follow up. Clearly a stamp of approval from getting on a BBC is a great thing to have, something we still aspire to. But do they actually produce enough in house drama content anymore that they can claim to be able to facilitate a career ladder to climb?

It was a very interesting conversation. And it made me more confident that ever that the advice of 'growing yourself as a writer' and 'doing it your way' is sensible and prudent for any writer.

You can see more about Martin at www.martinday.co.uk and find him on twitter - @sirdigbychicken